Posted by Amy Pak on

Can We Trust the History Books We Read? THIS is a loaded question. First of all, know this. ALL history is written with a bias. Any author is going to bend, support, or omit information that will create a view or meet an agenda. At best, we can call it a “perspective”; at worst, “propaganda.”

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Posted by The Home School in the Woods Team on

On February 25, 1948, Martin Luther King, Jr. was ordained a Baptist minister and became an assistant pastor at his father’s church in Atlanta, Georgia. As for how he helped organize the first African-American civil rights movement – you’ll have to keep reading and find out!

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Posted by The Home School in the Woods Team on

Abraham Lincoln is by far one of America’s most well-known presidents – and for good reason, since he managed to accomplish a great deal during his relatively short life! From being the 16th president of the United States to saving the Union during the Civil War, Abe Lincoln’s legacy continues to spark interest.

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Posted by The Home School in the Woods Team on

Throughout history, people have been captivated by gold and would do nearly anything to obtain it. On January 24, 1848, gold was discovered by James Wilson Marshall at Sutter's Mill, California. Although he would try to keep it secret, it would soon be found and spark the California Gold Rush and others to follow.

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Posted by The Home School in the Woods Team on

Today, we want to talk about a unique Colonial craft you can do with your kids called “punch tin” or “punched tin.” Mostly seen in the form of rustic lanterns, punch tin involves taking a tin container (a popular material used during that time) and punching holes into it so light can shine through.

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